St. Tammany Republican Groups
      
                Connecting the Republican Community
                        in St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana
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St.Tammany Parish Republican Groups
In St. Tammany Parish there are presently over 160,000 registered Republicans.  We are the plurality party of choice working towards registering voters as Republicans to become the majority party. We hope that your visit to this website will provide you with the political insight to make informed decisions in voting for candidates and propositions.  We encourage you to get active in our party and if you or your friends are not already Republicans, please join us now.  Please take time to visit each group's individual page.


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February 2, 2019
THE SCALISE CAPITOL REPORT
Securing the Border Means Saving Lives
I recently received a call from a mother of a fire chief in south Louisiana, Spencer Chauvin. Spencer Chauvin was responding to a call as fire chief in St. John the Baptist Parish. As he was responding to that call he was killed by someone who is in this country illegally. He never got to go home that night to his wife and children, a six-year-old and eight-year-old, and he doesn’t get to talk to his mother anymore. I spoke on the House floor this week to honor his life and stress the human toll of open borders. This is why we must secure the border. 

Click here to watch the full speech.

Standing Against Anti-Semitism
I am alarmed by incidents of anti-Semitism across the country, including a growing incidence of anti-Semitic rhetoric and association with anti-Semitic leaders from some Democrat Members of Congress. We cannot pretend this is a thing of the past; anti-Semitic incidents are on the rise, including the shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh and the vandalism of a synagogue in St. Tammany Parish last September. The American people look to their leaders to take a stand. Like the House of Representatives recently condemned the hateful ideology of white supremacy, we must also condemn anti-Semitism. I have joined with my colleague Rep. Lee Zeldin of New York on a resolution to condemn this hate. Hate in all its forms is wrong, and we as leaders need to stand up against hate and bigotry. Speaker Pelosi should immediately schedule a vote to pass this resolution on the House floor.

Fighting to Improve Flood Control in St. Tammany Parish
St. Tammany Parish President Pat Brister visited the Capitol this week. We had a productive meeting on how we can work together to improve flood control on the Northshore. 


St. Tammany Parish President Pat Brister and I met to discuss flood production issues for the Northshore. 

Working with Louisiana Shrimpers
I sat down with members of the Louisiana Shrimp Association to discuss how we can improve even further Louisiana's strong reputation for producing the highest quality shrimp. 


I enjoyed welcoming members of the Louisiana Shrimp Association to my Capitol office.

It is an honor to represent you in Congress. For more information please visit my website, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook pages.


God Bless,


Steve Scalise
House Republican Whip

Website  |   About  |   Contact Me  |   Serving You  |   Media Center  |   Legislative Work  |   Our District  |   Resources
 
February 2, 2019
THE SCALISE CAPITOL REPORT

Securing the Border Means Saving Lives
I recently received a call from a mother of a fire chief in south Louisiana, Spencer Chauvin. Spencer Chauvin was responding to a call as fire chief in St. John the Baptist Parish. As he was responding to that call he was killed by someone who is in this country illegally. He never got to go home that night to his wife and children, a six-year-old and eight-year-old, and he doesn’t get to talk to his mother anymore. I spoke on the House floor this week to honor his life and stress the human toll of open borders. This is why we must secure the border. 

Click here to watch the full speech.

Standing Against Anti-Semitism
I am alarmed by incidents of anti-Semitism across the country, including a growing incidence of anti-Semitic rhetoric and association with anti-Semitic leaders from some Democrat Members of Congress. We cannot pretend this is a thing of the past; anti-Semitic incidents are on the rise, including the shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh and the vandalism of a synagogue in St. Tammany Parish last September. The American people look to their leaders to take a stand. Like the House of Representatives recently condemned the hateful ideology of white supremacy, we must also condemn anti-Semitism. I have joined with my colleague Rep. Lee Zeldin of New York on a resolution to condemn this hate. Hate in all its forms is wrong, and we as leaders need to stand up against hate and bigotry. Speaker Pelosi should immediately schedule a vote to pass this resolution on the House floor.

Fighting to Improve Flood Control in St. Tammany Parish
St. Tammany Parish President Pat Brister visited the Capitol this week. We had a productive meeting on how we can work together to improve flood control on the Northshore. 


St. Tammany Parish President Pat Brister and I met to discuss flood production issues for the Northshore. 


Working with Louisiana Shrimpers
I sat down with members of the Louisiana Shrimp Association to discuss how we can improve even further Louisiana's strong reputation for producing the highest quality shrimp. 


I enjoyed welcoming members of the Louisiana Shrimp Association to my Capitol office.


It is an honor to represent you in Congress. For more information please visit my websiteTwitterInstagram, and Facebook pages.


God Bless,


Steve Scalise
House Republican Whip
ATT75905 1.jpg
For Immediate ReleaseContact:
February 5, 2019Ty Bofferding
202-224-5824
 
 
Bipartisan Group of Senators Seek Answers from Health Care Providers and Insurers on Surprise Medical Bills 
 
WASHINGTON—U.S. Senators Bill Cassidy, M.D. (R-LA), Michael Bennet (D-CO), Todd Young (R-IN), Tom Carper (D-DE), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), and Maggie Hassan (D-NH) are seeking answers from health care providers and insurers as part of their ongoing effort to develop bipartisan legislation to end surprise medical bills.
 
The senators’ latest questions for the health care industry seek more detailed information to supplement the input they received regarding draft legislation released in September 2018 by Senators Cassidy, Bennet, Young, Carper, Chuck Grassley (R-IA), and former Senator Claire McCaskill (D-MO).
  
“As we continue our bipartisan effort to lower health care costs and improve price transparency, we seek more detailed information in addition to what we have received thus far. Surprise medical billing is a complex problem, and crafting bipartisan, effective legislation to address it will require greater engagement from the private sector,” write the senators. “We want to protect patients from costly surprise bills while preventing undue disruption in the health care system. To meet this goal, it is critical that we receive additional data and more complete feedback in order to refine and inform our legislative proposal.”
 
The full text of the letter is below:
 
Dear Stakeholders:
 
As we continue our bipartisan effort to lower health care costs and improve price transparency, we seek more detailed information in addition to what we have received thus far. Surprise medical billing is a complex problem, and crafting bipartisan, effective legislation to address it will require greater engagement from the private sector. We want to protect patients from costly surprise bills while preventing undue disruption in the health care system. To meet this goal, it is critical that we receive additional data and more complete feedback in order to refine and inform our legislative proposal.
 
With this objective in mind, please send us the following information and data. In order to streamline the compilation of the information we receive, please respond in the following manner, to the extent possible:
 
  • With specific state-by-state data, as applicable, for the following states that have a balance billing law in effect: Alaska, California, Colorado, Florida, Maryland, New York, and Texas
  • An average across remaining states, for those states without any existing balance billing law
 
For questions pertaining to specific states, please feel free to return data in the manner specified in the questions themselves. 
 
Please supply data and feedback on the following questions:
 
PLAN QUESTIONS
 
  • What do you currently pay for out-of-network care on average, broken down by plan type (e.g., HMO, PPOs, etc.), market type (e.g., individual, small group, large group, ASOs), and provider type, and how do these rates compare to Medicare rates, average in-network rates, and provider charges?
 
  • What percentage of your plans’ premiums are currently attributable to the following specialty groups: emergency care (ER) physicians, radiologists, anesthesiologists, pathologists, ambulance services, and laboratory services?
 
  • For state laws that tie reimbursement to the 80th percentile of provider charges or another percentile of charges, please provide data and analysis on how and by what amount these reimbursement levels have affected premiums in these states. How has this affected contracting rates and charge rates? Can you provide the same information for states that have tied reimbursement to some multiple of Medicare rates and in-network negotiated rates? 
 
  • Can you provide data and modeling to demonstrate the effect on premiums for the current draft text’s proposed changes (e.g., median in-network rate or 125% of allowed in-network amount)? Can you also provide data and modeling to determine the effect on premiums if legislation were to use Medicare rates, as well as if it were to use 80th percentile of charges as payment benchmarks?
 
  • For states using independent dispute resolution processes to address balance billing, what has been the effect of the dispute resolution process on premiums and payment rates to providers, both in and out-of-network?  How often, and by how much, have the state dispute resolutions processes resulted in payments amounting to greater than or equal to the 80th percentile of charges? In dispute resolution processes, which party has been successful more frequently, and under which scenarios? If federal legislation to address balance billing included a baseball-style dispute resolution process policy, what would be the best entity to handle the process of dispute resolution? 
 
  • Do you have a process for identifying when providers send balance bills? 
  • If so, what is it?  Do you also track how much is reimbursed to providers by insurers? If so, how do these amounts compare? 
  • If not, why not? Will you consider a process for identifying when balance bills are sent by providers in the future?  
 
  • What specific recommendations do you have to facilitate network adequacy and encourage provider participation in health plan networks in the context of federal legislation to address surprise medical billing? 
 
  • What role do you think hospitals should play in combatting surprise medical billing? 
 
  • In your view, is there a state model that has worked particularly well at protecting patients from surprise medical billing? If so, why has it worked well? Please provide the details of this model, including its impact on contracting rates and out-of-network payment rates, and describe the data and policy rationale underlying this state legislation.
 
  • What share of plans that you administer (either directly or on behalf of another organization) have an out-of-network rate of beneficiary claims of 0-10%, 10-25%, 25-50%, or more than 50% for emergency room care?
 
  • What percent of balance bills sent by providers, that you are aware of, are more than $750? 
 
PROVIDER QUESTIONS
 
  • What is the average out-of-network payment that your providers receive for emergency services? How does this compare to Medicare and charges, broken down by plan type and market? How does this differ by state?  
 
  • How does the average out-of-network payment for ancillary providers compare with Medicare reimbursement and physician charges, again broken down by plan type and market?
 
 
  • What percentage of ER, radiology, anesthesiology, and pathology services are performed by providers that are part of outsourcing firms? For each of these specialties, what are the relative market shares for the large national staffing companies, local or regional physician groups, and hospital-staffed specialists? For providers employed by those firms, what percentage share the network status of the facility where they are practicing? 
 
  • What percentage of amounts paid for overall emergency care, by both patients and payors, can be attributed to balance billing (dollar amounts and/or percentage amounts)? How about for other specialty departments (e.g., anesthesiology, radiology, pathology, etc.)? If possible, please provide data showing the amounts (or percentages of overall emergency care) paid for services by out-of-network providers at in-network facilities, as well as in-network providers at out-of-network facilities. If possible, please provide data to compare private versus public payments in these scenarios.  Please also provide a breakdown of surprise medical bills attributable to each provider specialty.
 
  • In situations where the ED or ancillary physician is out-of-network but the facility is in-network, can you provide data to show how often a balance bill is sent to the patient?
 
  • What percentage of care provided in the emergency department results in bad debt from patients not paying their part of what is owed from care they received, from missed copayments, denied claims, or other means?
 
  • What specific recommendations do you have to facilitate in-network contracting between providers and plans in the context of federal legislation to address surprise medical billing? 
 
  • What percentage of care provided by providers within each specialty is out-of-network? Broken down by each specialty, what share of providers are out-of-network for 0-10%, 10-25%, 25-50%, or more than 50% of the commercially insured patients (not including Medicaid managed care) they see? 
 
  • Can you identify specific states where providers have a lower-than-average contracting rate?
 
  • What role do you think that hospitals should play in combatting surprise medical billing? 
 
  • In your view, is there a state model that has worked particularly well at protecting patients from surprise medical billing? If so, why has it worked well? Please provide the details of this model, including its impact on contracting rates and out-of-network payment rates, and describe the data and policy rationale underlying this state legislation.
 
  • What percentage of balance bills are more than $750? 
 
By providing comprehensive answers to these questions, you will inform our work on this issue and help bring relief from surprise medical bills to Americans in a timely manner. We respectfully request your response to Transparency@cassidy.senate.gov by Feb. 18, 2019. We look forward to reviewing your submissions.
Information provided regarding political events or political candidates is provided for informational purposes only.  It does not in any way indicate an endorsement by any St. Tammany Republican Clubs, their boards or officers.
Scenes from the 2018 Lincoln Reagan Banquet
LFRW Region 7 Vice President Michelle Pichon held a Region 7 meeting, and the ladies in attendance agreed, "The future's so bright I have to wear shades!"
Grand New Party
It began in a little schoolhouse in Ripon, Wisconsin, in 1854. A small group of dedicated abolitionists gathered to fight the expansion of slavery, and they gave birth to a Party dedicated to freedom and equal opportunity.
The name “Republican” was chosen, alluding to Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party and conveying a commitment to the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 
The Party was formally organized in July 1854 by thousands of anti-slavery activists at a convention in Jackson, Michigan. And it was no accident that two years later, in 1856, the first Republican National Convention took place in Philadelphia, where the Constitution was written.
Party of Freedom
Though popularized in a Thomas Nast cartoon, the GOP’s elephant symbol originated during the 1860 campaign, as a symbol of Republican strength.  Republicans envisioned “free soil, free speech, free labor.”  Under the leadership of President Abraham Lincoln, the GOP became the Party of the Union as well.
President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, but it was the entire Republican Party who freed the slaves.  The 1864 Republican National Convention called for the abolition of slavery, and Congressional Republicans passed the 13th Amendment unanimously, with only a few Democrat votes. 
The early women’s rights movement was solidly Republican, as it was a continuation of abolitionism.  They were careful not to be overly partisan, but as did Susan B. Anthony, most suffragists favored the GOP.  The 19th Amendment was written by a Republican senator and garnered greater support from Republicans than from Democrats.
Party of Prosperity
Low taxes, sound money, regulatory restraint: these were among the commonsense economic policies established by the GOP that brought about decades of prosperity after the Civil War.  Republicans encouraged innovation and rule of law.  Buttressed by Republican control in Congress, the McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt and Taft administrations cleared away obstacles to economic growth.
President Dwight Eisenhower and congressional Republicans appreciated the fact that the private sector, not government, is the engine of wealth creation. With his bold tax-cutting agenda, President Ronald Reagan revived the economy after years of Democrat malaise. 
Party of Vision
Theodore Roosevelt embodies our Party’s traditional concern for the environment, but the Republican commitment to the environment actually goes back much further than that.  For example, the world’s first national park, Yellowstone, was established during the Ulysses Grant administration.
President Eisenhower advocated groundbreaking civil rights legislation and vigorously enforced the Brown v Board of Education decision, sending the 101st Airborne to Little Rock when chaos erupted following integration at Central High.
Ronald Reagan explained the difference between Democrats and Republicans in a way that cannot be improved upon: “Two visions of the future, two fundamentally different ways of governing – their government of pessimism, fear, and limits, or ours of hope, confidence, and growth.  Their government sees people only as members of groups.  Ours serves all the people of America as individuals.”
President George H.W. Bush championed community and volunteer organizations and the tremendous power they have for doing good. He famously described them as “a brilliant diversity spread like stars, like a thousand points of light in a broad and peaceful sky.”
In the first decade of the 21st century, President George W. Bush made an unprecedented commitment to helping those in need beyond our shores through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), an aid program for countries devastated by HIV/AIDS. Since its inception, PEPFAR has saved over a million lives and currently provides over 5 million people with life-saving treatments.
Party of Strength
President Reagan and President George H.W. Bush led western democracies to victory over Soviet tyranny in the Cold War.  The George W. Bush administration maintained the military second-to-none and projected that power in the fight against international terrorism.
Party of the Future
Drawing inspiration from our Party’s history, today’s Republicans believe individuals, not government, make the best decisions; all people are entitled to equal rights; and decisions are best made close to home.
At the state level, the nation’s thirty Republican governors are making government more effective and efficient, spurring economic growth and striving to put more power in the hands of the people.
Nationally, Republicans recognize that the slow, bloated, top-down Washington bureaucracy is out-of-date in the 21st century. Our Party works to give Americans more choices—in healthcare, in education, in energy, and in the economy—and to free individuals and families from the intrusive overreach of federal bureaucrats.
The Party’s core principles of freedom and equal opportunity are as relevant today as at our founding, and they are the roadmap for American renewal in a new and interconnected world. 
MOMENTS IN HISTORY
March 20, 1854
First Republican Party meeting in Ripon, Wisconsin
January 1, 1863
President Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation
January 31, 1865
Republican-controlled 38th Congress passes the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery
June 13, 1866
With unanimous Republican support and against intense Democrat opposition, Congress passes the 14th Amendment
March 1, 1872
Republican-controlled 42nd Congress establishes Yellowstone as first national park
December 9, 1872
First African-American governor, Pinckney Pinchback (R-LA), inaugurated
March 4, 1917
First woman in Congress, Rep. Jeannette Rankin (R-MT), sworn in
June 4, 1919
Republican-controlled 66th Congress passes the 19th Amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote
June 2, 1924
Republican-controlled 68th Congress and President Calvin Coolidge grant citizenship to Native Americans with the Indian Citizenship Act
December 7, 1928
First Hispanic U.S. Senator, Senator Octaviano Larrazolo (R-NM), sworn in
January 3, 1949
Margaret Chase Smith (R-ME) becomes the first woman to serve in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.
May 17, 1954
Brown v Board of Education strikes down racial segregation in public schools; majority decision written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, former Republican governor (CA) and vice presidential nominee
August 21, 1959
first Asian-American U.S. Senator, Hiram Fong (R-HI), is seated
September 9, 1957
President Dwight Eisenhower signs the 1957 Civil Rights Act
June 10, 1964
Senate passes the 1964 Civil Rights Act when the Republican leader, Everett Dirksen (R-IL), defeats Democrat filibuster
September 25, 1981
Sandra Day O’Connor, appointed by President Reagan, becomes first woman on the Supreme Court
June 12, 1987
President Ronald Reagan calls for liberation of East Europeans from Communism with “Tear Down This Wall” speechGrand New Party

GOP - Our History:  

It began in a little schoolhouse in Ripon, Wisconsin, in 1854. A small group of dedicated abolitionists gathered to fight the expansion of slavery, and they gave birth to a Party dedicated to freedom and equal opportunity.

The name “Republican” was chosen, alluding to Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party and conveying a commitment to the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 

The Party was formally organized in July 1854 by thousands of anti-slavery activists at a convention in Jackson, Michigan. And it was no accident that two years later, in 1856, the first Republican National Convention took place in Philadelphia, where the Constitution was written.

Party of Freedom

Though popularized in a Thomas Nast cartoon, the GOP’s elephant symbol originated during the 1860 campaign, as a symbol of Republican strength.  Republicans envisioned “free soil, free speech, free labor.”  Under the leadership of President Abraham Lincoln, the GOP became the Party of the Union as well.


President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, but it was the entire Republican Party who freed the slaves.  The 1864 Republican National Convention called for the abolition of slavery, and Congressional Republicans passed the 13th Amendment unanimously, with only a few Democrat votes. 


The early women’s rights movement was solidly Republican, as it was a continuation of abolitionism.  They were careful not to be overly partisan, but as did Susan B. Anthony, most suffragists favored the GOP.  The 19th Amendment was written by a Republican senator and garnered greater support from Republicans than from Democrats.

Party of Prosperity
Low taxes, sound money, regulatory restraint: these were among the commonsense economic policies established by the GOP that brought about decades of prosperity after the Civil War.  Republicans encouraged innovation and rule of law.  Buttressed by Republican control in Congress, the McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt and Taft administrations cleared away obstacles to economic growth.

President Dwight Eisenhower and congressional Republicans appreciated the fact that the private sector, not government, is the engine of wealth creation. With his bold tax-cutting agenda, President Ronald Reagan revived the economy after years of Democrat malaise. 

Party of Vision

Theodore Roosevelt embodies our Party’s traditional concern for the environment, but the Republican commitment to the environment actually goes back much further than that.  For example, the world’s first national park, Yellowstone, was established during the Ulysses Grant administration.

President Eisenhower advocated groundbreaking civil rights legislation and vigorously enforced the Brown v Board of Education decision, sending the 101st Airborne to Little Rock when chaos erupted following integration at Central High.

Ronald Reagan explained the difference between Democrats and Republicans in a way that cannot be improved upon: “Two visions of the future, two fundamentally different ways of governing – their government of pessimism, fear, and limits, or ours of hope, confidence, and growth.  Their government sees people only as members of groups.  Ours serves all the people of America as individuals.”

President George H.W. Bush championed community and volunteer organizations and the tremendous power they have for doing good. He famously described them as “a brilliant diversity spread like stars, like a thousand points of light in a broad and peaceful sky.”

In the first decade of the 21st century, President George W. Bush made an unprecedented commitment to helping those in need beyond our shores through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), an aid program for countries devastated by HIV/AIDS. Since its inception, PEPFAR has saved over a million lives and currently provides over 5 million people with life-saving treatments.

Party of Strength
President Reagan and President George H.W. Bush led western democracies to victory over Soviet tyranny in the Cold War.  The George W. Bush administration maintained the military second-to-none and projected that power in the fight against international terrorism.

Party of the Future
Drawing inspiration from our Party’s history, today’s Republicans believe individuals, not government, make the best decisions; all people are entitled to equal rights; and decisions are best made close to home.

At the state level, the nation’s thirty Republican governors are making government more effective and efficient, spurring economic growth and striving to put more power in the hands of the people.

Nationally, Republicans recognize that the slow, bloated, top-down Washington bureaucracy is out-of-date in the 21st century. Our Party works to give Americans more choices—in healthcare, in education, in energy, and in the economy—and to free individuals and families from the intrusive overreach of federal bureaucrats.

The Party’s core principles of freedom and equal opportunity are as relevant today as at our founding, and they are the roadmap for American renewal in a new and interconnected world. 

MOMENTS IN HISTORY

March 20, 1854
First Republican Party meeting in Ripon, Wisconsin

January 1, 1863
President Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation

January 31, 1865
Republican-controlled 38th Congress passes the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery

June 13, 1866
With unanimous Republican support and against intense Democrat opposition, Congress passes the 14th Amendment

March 1, 1872
Republican-controlled 42nd Congress establishes Yellowstone as first national park

December 9, 1872
First African-American governor, Pinckney Pinchback (R-LA), inaugurated

March 4, 1917
First woman in Congress, Rep. Jeannette Rankin (R-MT), sworn in

June 4, 1919
Republican-controlled 66th Congress passes the 19th Amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote

June 2, 1924
Republican-controlled 68th Congress and President Calvin Coolidge grant citizenship to Native Americans with the Indian Citizenship Act

December 7, 1928
First Hispanic U.S. Senator, Senator Octaviano Larrazolo (R-NM), sworn in

January 3, 1949
Margaret Chase Smith (R-ME) becomes the first woman to serve in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.

May 17, 1954
Brown v Board of Education strikes down racial segregation in public schools; majority decision written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, former Republican governor (CA) and vice presidential nominee

August 21, 1959
First Asian-American U.S. Senator, Hiram Fong (R-HI), is seated

September 9, 1957
President Dwight Eisenhower signs the 1957 Civil Rights Act

June 10, 1964
Senate passes the 1964 Civil Rights Act when the Republican leader, Everett Dirksen (R-IL), defeats Democrat filibuster

September 25, 1981
Sandra Day O’Connor, appointed by President Reagan, becomes first woman on the Supreme Court

June 12, 1987
President Ronald Reagan calls for liberation of East Europeans from Communism with “Tear Down This Wall” speech.