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St.Tammany Parish Republican Groups
In St. Tammany Parish there are presently over 160,000 registered Republicans.  We are the plurality party of choice working towards registering voters as Republicans to become the majority party. We hope that your visit to this website will provide you with the political insight to make informed decisions in voting for candidates and propositions.  We encourage you to get active in our party and if you or your friends are not already Republicans, please join us now.  Please take time to visit each group's individual page.
Information provided regarding political events or political candidates is provided for informational purposes only.  It does not in any way indicate an endorsement by any St. Tammany Republican Clubs, their boards or officers.

For Immediate Release

Contact:

March 8, 2019

View Online

Ty Bofferding

202-224-5824

 

Cassidy, Colleagues Reintroduce Bipartisan Legislation to Make Higher Education More Accessible & Affordable

 

WASHINGTON, DC—U.S. Senators Bill Cassidy, M.D. (R-LA), Gary Peters (D-MI), and John Boozman (R-AR) today reintroduced bipartisan legislation to expand opportunities for high school students to obtain college credit, making higher education more accessible and affordable.

 

The Making Education Affordable and Accessible Act (MEAA) would help improve high school and college graduation rates by expanding the use of existing grants to institutions of higher education to expand their dual and concurrent enrollment initiatives and early/middle college programs. 

 

Concurrent enrollment provides high school students the opportunity to take college-credit bearing courses taught by college-approved high school teachers, allowing students to begin working toward their associate’s degree. This saves students and families money, while preparing them for the workforce.

 

“This legislation reduces the financial strain on Louisiana families by making college and career level coursework available to more high school students,” said Dr. Cassidy. “To bring high-skilled jobs with good pay and benefits to our state and the rest of our country, we need a highly capable workforce. This bill prepares more Americans for tomorrow’s jobs.”

 

“Rising costs of higher education should never stop students from furthering their careers and pursuing their dreams. I’m going to continue working on ways to reduce the financial burden of higher education for Michigan families,” said Senator Peters. “This bipartisan bill will support the many paths for Michigan students to gain college credit without having to take on student debt and prepare them to succeed in today’s workforce.”

  

“Concurrent enrollment and early college programs have a proven track record of effectiveness in Arkansas. Making these programs more accessible creates opportunities for students in Arkansas and across the country to develop in-demand skills sooner or make progress toward higher learning, which in turn helps to increase the talent pool for local businesses,” Senator Boozman said. 

 

The Making Education Affordable and Accessible Act (MEAA) would allow money from the Higher Education Act Title VII Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) to be used to provide grants to institutions of higher education. These grants can be used to:

 

  • Carry out dual and concurrent enrollment programs as well as early/middle college programming;
  • Provide teachers in these programs with professional development; and
  • Support activities such as course design, course approval processes, community outreach, student counseling and support services.

  

The MEAA is supported by a broad group of education organizations and institutions:

   

“Strengthening the connection between secondary and postsecondary education, and expanding dual and concurrent enrollment programs, is critical to ensuring students have the skills that today’s labor market demands,” said LeAnn Wilson, Executive Director of the Association for Career and Technical Education. “By improving access to higher education for secondary students and by providing professional development resources to educators, MEAA makes important strides in fueling the talent pipeline for the 21st century American workforce. ACTE is pleased to endorse the bill and commends its bipartisan sponsors.”

  

“At GEO Academies, we support our students in their quest to be successful in college and/or careers by starting them in college courses on a real college campus as early as 9th grade,” said Kevin Teasley, President of the GEO Foundation. “We are their support team and their safety net to help them be successful in their college and career pursuits. The Making Education Affordable and Accessible Act will support our efforts to grow our program and serve more students.”

 

“Today, more than half of jobs require some form of postsecondary education and yet, far too many students face steep barriers to accessing these opportunities," said Kimberly Green, Executive Director of Advance Career and Technical Education. “The Making Education Affordable and Accessible Act would greatly improve access to critical dual and concurrent enrollment programs so that more students can earn a postsecondary degree or credential at a faster rate, vastly improving their career prospects and success.”

 

“Now more than ever, we need to provide students with accelerated routes to credentials that lead to meaningful career opportunities. The chance to earn college credit while still in high school, through dual enrollment or early college high schools, is a critical step on that pathway,” said Maria Flynn, President and CEO, Jobs for the Future. “The Making Education Accessible and Affordable Act would support the expansion of college in high school programs so that more students, particularly those from underserved backgrounds, can benefit from these opportunities.”

 

“Under today’s student debt crisis, too many individuals are being hampered by the financial burdens of their postsecondary education,” said Marc Egan, National Education Association (NEA) Government Relations Director.  “Expanding greater access to high quality dual enrollment courses would not only provide an accelerated opportunity for students to receive a postsecondary degree, but also reduce their student debt. NEA is proud to once again support Senator Peters on this important legislation.”

 

“ACT applauds Sens. Peters and Cassidy on the introduction of the Making Education Affordable and Accessible Act, which expands opportunities for students to participate in dual and concurrent enrollment programs,” said Scott Montgomery, Senior Vice President at ACT, Inc. "The incentives in this bill would not only help college-ready high school students earn college credit and move closer to a college degree, but would also recognize that high-quality programs require qualified, effective teachers, and essential support services.”  

 

“School leaders all across the country report that dual and concurrent enrollment programs are successful on many fronts: Learning in the context of career development provides additional relevance to the curriculum and introduces them to postsecondary work, which further empowers students to pursue their dreams,” said JoAnn Bartoletti, the Executive Director of the National Association of Secondary School Principals. “Dual enrollment inspires students to continue their learning beyond high school, gives them a cost-effective head start on that learning, and sparks a closer working relationship between districts, postsecondary institutions, and local businesses. With targeted support like the Making Education Affordable and Accessible Act, these benefits can be accelerated and replicated all across the nation and unlock the human potential of each student in our schools.”

 

“Time and cost are the most significant barriers to student success. The Making Education Affordable and Accessible Act cuts the cost of college, reduces the time to a degree and helps prepare students for career and life success regardless of family income,” said KnowledgeWorks President and CEO, Chuck Ambrose. “Earning post-secondary credits in high school is a proven, high-impact approach to preparing students to succeed in a rapidly changing economy. This Act is an important step to getting education barriers removed.”

 

“College is just a dream for too many students who either can’t afford the tuition or aren't prepared to do the work,” said Chiefs for Change. “We support the Make Education Affordable and Accessible Act because it would expand opportunities for high school students to obtain college credit. By allowing students to take rigorous, college-level courses while still in high school, we can make college more affordable and increase the likelihood that students earn a degree, ultimately setting them on a path to lifelong success.”

 

“Some of the most engaging and bright students at our college are in our DEED (Dual Enrollment EDucation) program,” said David E. Schroeder, President of Pillar College. “Learning from college professors alongside college freshmen and sophomores models the kind of seriousness that puts these young people, not just on a fast track to graduation, but also makes them better students for their entire academic career. I heartily endorse the Making Education Affordable and Accessible Act sponsored by Senators Peters and Cassidy.” 

 

Scenes from the 2018 Lincoln Reagan Banquet
LFRW Region 7 Vice President Michelle Pichon held a Region 7 meeting, and the ladies in attendance agreed, "The future's so bright I have to wear shades!"
Grand New Party
It began in a little schoolhouse in Ripon, Wisconsin, in 1854. A small group of dedicated abolitionists gathered to fight the expansion of slavery, and they gave birth to a Party dedicated to freedom and equal opportunity.
The name “Republican” was chosen, alluding to Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party and conveying a commitment to the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 
The Party was formally organized in July 1854 by thousands of anti-slavery activists at a convention in Jackson, Michigan. And it was no accident that two years later, in 1856, the first Republican National Convention took place in Philadelphia, where the Constitution was written.
Party of Freedom
Though popularized in a Thomas Nast cartoon, the GOP’s elephant symbol originated during the 1860 campaign, as a symbol of Republican strength.  Republicans envisioned “free soil, free speech, free labor.”  Under the leadership of President Abraham Lincoln, the GOP became the Party of the Union as well.
President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, but it was the entire Republican Party who freed the slaves.  The 1864 Republican National Convention called for the abolition of slavery, and Congressional Republicans passed the 13th Amendment unanimously, with only a few Democrat votes. 
The early women’s rights movement was solidly Republican, as it was a continuation of abolitionism.  They were careful not to be overly partisan, but as did Susan B. Anthony, most suffragists favored the GOP.  The 19th Amendment was written by a Republican senator and garnered greater support from Republicans than from Democrats.
Party of Prosperity
Low taxes, sound money, regulatory restraint: these were among the commonsense economic policies established by the GOP that brought about decades of prosperity after the Civil War.  Republicans encouraged innovation and rule of law.  Buttressed by Republican control in Congress, the McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt and Taft administrations cleared away obstacles to economic growth.
President Dwight Eisenhower and congressional Republicans appreciated the fact that the private sector, not government, is the engine of wealth creation. With his bold tax-cutting agenda, President Ronald Reagan revived the economy after years of Democrat malaise. 
Party of Vision
Theodore Roosevelt embodies our Party’s traditional concern for the environment, but the Republican commitment to the environment actually goes back much further than that.  For example, the world’s first national park, Yellowstone, was established during the Ulysses Grant administration.
President Eisenhower advocated groundbreaking civil rights legislation and vigorously enforced the Brown v Board of Education decision, sending the 101st Airborne to Little Rock when chaos erupted following integration at Central High.
Ronald Reagan explained the difference between Democrats and Republicans in a way that cannot be improved upon: “Two visions of the future, two fundamentally different ways of governing – their government of pessimism, fear, and limits, or ours of hope, confidence, and growth.  Their government sees people only as members of groups.  Ours serves all the people of America as individuals.”
President George H.W. Bush championed community and volunteer organizations and the tremendous power they have for doing good. He famously described them as “a brilliant diversity spread like stars, like a thousand points of light in a broad and peaceful sky.”
In the first decade of the 21st century, President George W. Bush made an unprecedented commitment to helping those in need beyond our shores through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), an aid program for countries devastated by HIV/AIDS. Since its inception, PEPFAR has saved over a million lives and currently provides over 5 million people with life-saving treatments.
Party of Strength
President Reagan and President George H.W. Bush led western democracies to victory over Soviet tyranny in the Cold War.  The George W. Bush administration maintained the military second-to-none and projected that power in the fight against international terrorism.
Party of the Future
Drawing inspiration from our Party’s history, today’s Republicans believe individuals, not government, make the best decisions; all people are entitled to equal rights; and decisions are best made close to home.
At the state level, the nation’s thirty Republican governors are making government more effective and efficient, spurring economic growth and striving to put more power in the hands of the people.
Nationally, Republicans recognize that the slow, bloated, top-down Washington bureaucracy is out-of-date in the 21st century. Our Party works to give Americans more choices—in healthcare, in education, in energy, and in the economy—and to free individuals and families from the intrusive overreach of federal bureaucrats.
The Party’s core principles of freedom and equal opportunity are as relevant today as at our founding, and they are the roadmap for American renewal in a new and interconnected world. 
MOMENTS IN HISTORY
March 20, 1854
First Republican Party meeting in Ripon, Wisconsin
January 1, 1863
President Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation
January 31, 1865
Republican-controlled 38th Congress passes the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery
June 13, 1866
With unanimous Republican support and against intense Democrat opposition, Congress passes the 14th Amendment
March 1, 1872
Republican-controlled 42nd Congress establishes Yellowstone as first national park
December 9, 1872
First African-American governor, Pinckney Pinchback (R-LA), inaugurated
March 4, 1917
First woman in Congress, Rep. Jeannette Rankin (R-MT), sworn in
June 4, 1919
Republican-controlled 66th Congress passes the 19th Amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote
June 2, 1924
Republican-controlled 68th Congress and President Calvin Coolidge grant citizenship to Native Americans with the Indian Citizenship Act
December 7, 1928
First Hispanic U.S. Senator, Senator Octaviano Larrazolo (R-NM), sworn in
January 3, 1949
Margaret Chase Smith (R-ME) becomes the first woman to serve in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.
May 17, 1954
Brown v Board of Education strikes down racial segregation in public schools; majority decision written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, former Republican governor (CA) and vice presidential nominee
August 21, 1959
first Asian-American U.S. Senator, Hiram Fong (R-HI), is seated
September 9, 1957
President Dwight Eisenhower signs the 1957 Civil Rights Act
June 10, 1964
Senate passes the 1964 Civil Rights Act when the Republican leader, Everett Dirksen (R-IL), defeats Democrat filibuster
September 25, 1981
Sandra Day O’Connor, appointed by President Reagan, becomes first woman on the Supreme Court
June 12, 1987
President Ronald Reagan calls for liberation of East Europeans from Communism with “Tear Down This Wall” speechGrand New Party

GOP - Our History:  

It began in a little schoolhouse in Ripon, Wisconsin, in 1854. A small group of dedicated abolitionists gathered to fight the expansion of slavery, and they gave birth to a Party dedicated to freedom and equal opportunity.

The name “Republican” was chosen, alluding to Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party and conveying a commitment to the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 

The Party was formally organized in July 1854 by thousands of anti-slavery activists at a convention in Jackson, Michigan. And it was no accident that two years later, in 1856, the first Republican National Convention took place in Philadelphia, where the Constitution was written.

Party of Freedom

Though popularized in a Thomas Nast cartoon, the GOP’s elephant symbol originated during the 1860 campaign, as a symbol of Republican strength.  Republicans envisioned “free soil, free speech, free labor.”  Under the leadership of President Abraham Lincoln, the GOP became the Party of the Union as well.


President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, but it was the entire Republican Party who freed the slaves.  The 1864 Republican National Convention called for the abolition of slavery, and Congressional Republicans passed the 13th Amendment unanimously, with only a few Democrat votes. 


The early women’s rights movement was solidly Republican, as it was a continuation of abolitionism.  They were careful not to be overly partisan, but as did Susan B. Anthony, most suffragists favored the GOP.  The 19th Amendment was written by a Republican senator and garnered greater support from Republicans than from Democrats.

Party of Prosperity
Low taxes, sound money, regulatory restraint: these were among the commonsense economic policies established by the GOP that brought about decades of prosperity after the Civil War.  Republicans encouraged innovation and rule of law.  Buttressed by Republican control in Congress, the McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt and Taft administrations cleared away obstacles to economic growth.

President Dwight Eisenhower and congressional Republicans appreciated the fact that the private sector, not government, is the engine of wealth creation. With his bold tax-cutting agenda, President Ronald Reagan revived the economy after years of Democrat malaise. 

Party of Vision

Theodore Roosevelt embodies our Party’s traditional concern for the environment, but the Republican commitment to the environment actually goes back much further than that.  For example, the world’s first national park, Yellowstone, was established during the Ulysses Grant administration.

President Eisenhower advocated groundbreaking civil rights legislation and vigorously enforced the Brown v Board of Education decision, sending the 101st Airborne to Little Rock when chaos erupted following integration at Central High.

Ronald Reagan explained the difference between Democrats and Republicans in a way that cannot be improved upon: “Two visions of the future, two fundamentally different ways of governing – their government of pessimism, fear, and limits, or ours of hope, confidence, and growth.  Their government sees people only as members of groups.  Ours serves all the people of America as individuals.”

President George H.W. Bush championed community and volunteer organizations and the tremendous power they have for doing good. He famously described them as “a brilliant diversity spread like stars, like a thousand points of light in a broad and peaceful sky.”

In the first decade of the 21st century, President George W. Bush made an unprecedented commitment to helping those in need beyond our shores through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), an aid program for countries devastated by HIV/AIDS. Since its inception, PEPFAR has saved over a million lives and currently provides over 5 million people with life-saving treatments.

Party of Strength
President Reagan and President George H.W. Bush led western democracies to victory over Soviet tyranny in the Cold War.  The George W. Bush administration maintained the military second-to-none and projected that power in the fight against international terrorism.

Party of the Future
Drawing inspiration from our Party’s history, today’s Republicans believe individuals, not government, make the best decisions; all people are entitled to equal rights; and decisions are best made close to home.

At the state level, the nation’s thirty Republican governors are making government more effective and efficient, spurring economic growth and striving to put more power in the hands of the people.

Nationally, Republicans recognize that the slow, bloated, top-down Washington bureaucracy is out-of-date in the 21st century. Our Party works to give Americans more choices—in healthcare, in education, in energy, and in the economy—and to free individuals and families from the intrusive overreach of federal bureaucrats.

The Party’s core principles of freedom and equal opportunity are as relevant today as at our founding, and they are the roadmap for American renewal in a new and interconnected world. 

MOMENTS IN HISTORY

March 20, 1854
First Republican Party meeting in Ripon, Wisconsin

January 1, 1863
President Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation

January 31, 1865
Republican-controlled 38th Congress passes the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery

June 13, 1866
With unanimous Republican support and against intense Democrat opposition, Congress passes the 14th Amendment

March 1, 1872
Republican-controlled 42nd Congress establishes Yellowstone as first national park

December 9, 1872
First African-American governor, Pinckney Pinchback (R-LA), inaugurated

March 4, 1917
First woman in Congress, Rep. Jeannette Rankin (R-MT), sworn in

June 4, 1919
Republican-controlled 66th Congress passes the 19th Amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote

June 2, 1924
Republican-controlled 68th Congress and President Calvin Coolidge grant citizenship to Native Americans with the Indian Citizenship Act

December 7, 1928
First Hispanic U.S. Senator, Senator Octaviano Larrazolo (R-NM), sworn in

January 3, 1949
Margaret Chase Smith (R-ME) becomes the first woman to serve in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.

May 17, 1954
Brown v Board of Education strikes down racial segregation in public schools; majority decision written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, former Republican governor (CA) and vice presidential nominee

August 21, 1959
First Asian-American U.S. Senator, Hiram Fong (R-HI), is seated

September 9, 1957
President Dwight Eisenhower signs the 1957 Civil Rights Act

June 10, 1964
Senate passes the 1964 Civil Rights Act when the Republican leader, Everett Dirksen (R-IL), defeats Democrat filibuster

September 25, 1981
Sandra Day O’Connor, appointed by President Reagan, becomes first woman on the Supreme Court

June 12, 1987
President Ronald Reagan calls for liberation of East Europeans from Communism with “Tear Down This Wall” speech.