St. Tammany Republican Groups
      
                Connecting the Republican Community
                        in St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana
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St.Tammany Parish Republican Groups
In St. Tammany Parish there are presently over 160,000 registered Republicans.  We are the plurality party of choice working towards registering voters as Republicans to become the majority party. We hope that your visit to this website will provide you with the political insight to make informed decisions in voting for candidates and propositions.  We encourage you to get active in our party and if you or your friends are not already Republicans, please join us now.  Please take time to visit each group's individual page.

ATT23573 1.jpg
For Immediate Release Contact:
February 27, 2018
View Online
Ty Bofferding
202-224-5824
 
 
Cassidy, Colleagues Introduce Bipartisan Bill to Bolster Fight Against Opioid Epidemic
 
WASHINGTON— U.S. Senators Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Rob Portman (R-OH), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV), Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Dan Sullivan (R-AK), Maggie Hassan (D-NH) and Maria Cantwell (D-WA) today introduced the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) 2.0 Act, bipartisan legislation to increase the funding authorization levels for the CARA programs enacted in 2016 and put in place additional policy reforms to help combat the opioid epidemic. 
 
CARA is a bipartisan law passed in 2016 and designed to ensure that federal resources are devoted to evidence-based education, treatment and recovery programs that work. CARA 2.0 builds on this effort by increasing the funding authorization levels to better coincide with the recent budget agreement while laying out new policy reforms to strengthen the federal government’s response to this crisis.
 
“We must keep up the fight against the opioid crisis in Louisiana to support healthier families and safer communities,” said Dr. Cassidy. “This legislation builds on our efforts to help those struggling with addiction recover and return to wholeness. I’m glad the Protection from Overprescribing Act is included in this bill, so law enforcement gets the information they need to identify providers who are overprescribing and fueling this crisis.”
 
“Now that CARA has been implemented and is starting to help communities around the country, it’s time to start the discussion about reauthorizing this important federal law,” said Senator Portman. “Passage of CARA was a historic moment, the first time in decades that Congress passed comprehensive addiction legislation, and the first time Congress has ever supported long-term addiction recovery. Now we have the opportunity to build on this effort, increasing funding levels for programs we know work and implementing additional policy reforms that will make a real difference in combatting this epidemic. I want to thank Senator Whitehouse and my bipartisan colleagues for their leadership and partnership on this important national effort.”
 
“Senator Portman’s and my comprehensive addiction bill was an important step forward in our battle against addiction,” said Senator Whitehouse. “It treats addiction for the disease that it is, and provides support for those walking the long, noble path of recovery. States like Rhode Island are already putting CARA funding and programs to good use. Now it’s time to extend CARA’s reach deeper into communities where the opioid crisis rages, and, given what we learned from people on the front lines of that crisis, add new policy reforms we know can make a difference. I’m excited to join Senator Portman and this bipartisan group of cosponsors to meld the commitments we made in the funding deal with the progress we enacted in CARA.”
 
“The opioid epidemic truly is a national crisis that is affecting families and communities across the country, and in West Virginia, we’ve become far too familiar with its consequences,” Senator Capito said. “While we’ve accomplished a lot in terms of drawing attention to the drug epidemic and providing resources to help address it, it’s painfully clear that we still have a long way to go and need to be doing even more. This bipartisan legislation will help continue efforts that are critical to fighting the opioid epidemic and providing help to individuals struggling with addiction. This is an important next step in a much broader effort, and I’m confident it will bring us closer to making real progress in this fight.”
 
“Opioid addiction has increased exponentially in the last decade, rising to the level of a public health emergency and affecting millions of Americans across the county,” said Senator Klobuchar. “The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) has made real strides in tackling this epidemic, and CARA 2.0  will increase our investment and commitment to proven strategies for combating opioid addition. Doubling down on the opioid crisis is as critical as ever, and this bill will help more families to access the treatment and recovery services they need.”
 
“Combatting the opioid addiction crisis in Alaska continues to be one of my top priorities in the U.S. Senate,” said Senator Sullivan. “Building off the momentum of CARA, CARA 2.0 will significantly increase funding levels for evidence-based treatment programs and enhance prescription drug monitoring, while also addressing many challenges unique to Alaska, such as prioritizing highly rural areas, including tribal regions, in the direction of funding. The scourge of addiction knows no social, economic or geographic boundary – it affects Alaskans and Americans from all walks of life. I am pleased to work with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to ensure that those struggling get the help they need, when they need it.”
 
“The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act 2.0 is a critical next step in our efforts to help save lives and strengthen prevention, treatment, recovery, and law enforcement efforts,” Senator Hassan said. “As part of the bipartisan budget agreement, we secured $6 billion in additional funds to combat the opioid epidemic, and this bill identifies some of the key areas that should be prioritized as we work to get funding to communities that need it most. This bill will help support additional treatment capacity and it will also help ensure that first responders are safe and well trained when responding to overdoses – a priority that I have heard about from New Hampshire public safety officials. It would also increase potential penalties on opioid manufacturers who have played a significant role in fueling this epidemic. I am grateful to Senators Rob Portman, Sheldon Whitehouse, and all of my colleagues on both sides of the aisle who came together to introduce this bill, and I will continue working across party lines to pass this bill without delay and strengthen our comprehensive response to this crisis.”
 
“The opioid and heroin epidemic has afflicted every area of our society and has taken the lives of more the 10,000 Washingtonians in less than 20 years,” said Senator Cantwell. “This bipartisan bill is the next step needed to provide expanded treatment, education, and prevention to combat this growing crisis.  And importantly, this legislation strengthens penalties on drug manufacturers who negligently distribute opioids in our communities.” 
 
CARA, which became law on July 22, 2016, authorized an additional $181 million for anti-opioid education, treatment and recovery programs, which were funded at $267 million for Fiscal Year 2017. The recent budget agreement includes $6 billion in additional resources for Fiscal Years 2018-2019. CARA 2.0 will build on the original law by providing an additional $1 billion in funding authorization for CARA’s evidence-based prevention, enforcement, treatment, and recovery programs:
 
CARA 2.0 Policy Reforms:
Require physicians and pharmacists use their state prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) upon prescribing or dispensing opioids.
Makes permanent CARA’s Section 303, which allows physician assistants and nurse practitioners to prescribe buprenorphine under the direction of a qualified physician.
Allows states to waive the limit on the number of patients a physician can treat with buprenorphine so long as they follow evidence-based guidelines. There is currently a cap of 100 patients per physician.
Increases civil and criminal penalties for opioid manufacturers that fail to report suspicious orders for opioids or fail to maintain effective controls against diversion of opioids.
Creates a national standard for recovery residence to ensure quality housing for individuals in long-term recovery.
Imposes three-day limit on initial opioid prescriptions for acute pain as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with exceptions for chronic pain or pain for other ongoing illnesses.
 
CARA 2.0 Authorization Levels:
$10 million to fund a National Education Campaign on the dangers of prescription opioid misuse, heroin, and lethal fentanyl (up from $5 million in the original CARA).
$300 million to expand evidence-based medication-assisted treatment (up from $25 million in the original CARA).
$300 million to expand first responder training and access to naloxone (up from $12 million in the original CARA).
$200 million to build a national infrastructure for recovery support services to help individuals move successfully from treatment into long-term recovery (up from $1 million in the original CARA).
$20 million to expand Veterans Treatment Courts (up from 6$ million in the original CARA).
$100 million to expand treatment for pregnant and postpartum women, including facilities that allow children to reside with their mothers (up from $17.9 million in the original CARA).
$60 million to help states develop an Infant Plan of Safe Care to assist states, hospitals and social services to report, track and assist newborns exposed to substances and their families (no authorization in the original CARA).
$10 million for a National Youth Recovery Initiative to develop, support, and maintain youth recovery support services (no authorization in the original CARA).
ATT23573 1.jpg
For Immediate ReleaseContact:
February 27, 2018Ty Bofferding
202-224-5824
 
 
Cassidy, Colleagues Introduce Bipartisan Bill to Bolster Fight Against Opioid Epidemic
 
WASHINGTON— U.S. Senators Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Rob Portman (R-OH), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV), Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Dan Sullivan (R-AK), Maggie Hassan (D-NH) and Maria Cantwell (D-WA) today introduced the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) 2.0 Act, bipartisan legislation to increase the funding authorization levels for the CARA programs enacted in 2016 and put in place additional policy reforms to help combat the opioid epidemic. 
 
CARA is a bipartisan law passed in 2016 and designed to ensure that federal resources are devoted to evidence-based education, treatment and recovery programs that work. CARA 2.0 builds on this effort by increasing the funding authorization levels to better coincide with the recent budget agreement while laying out new policy reforms to strengthen the federal government’s response to this crisis.
 
“We must keep up the fight against the opioid crisis in Louisiana to support healthier families and safer communities,” said Dr. Cassidy. “This legislation builds on our efforts to help those struggling with addiction recover and return to wholeness. I’m glad the Protection from Overprescribing Act is included in this bill, so law enforcement gets the information they need to identify providers who are overprescribing and fueling this crisis.”
 
“Now that CARA has been implemented and is starting to help communities around the country, it’s time to start the discussion about reauthorizing this important federal law,” said Senator Portman. “Passage of CARA was a historic moment, the first time in decades that Congress passed comprehensive addiction legislation, and the first time Congress has ever supported long-term addiction recovery. Now we have the opportunity to build on this effort, increasing funding levels for programs we know work and implementing additional policy reforms that will make a real difference in combatting this epidemic. I want to thank Senator Whitehouse and my bipartisan colleagues for their leadership and partnership on this important national effort.”
 
“Senator Portman’s and my comprehensive addiction bill was an important step forward in our battle against addiction,” said Senator Whitehouse. “It treats addiction for the disease that it is, and provides support for those walking the long, noble path of recovery. States like Rhode Island are already putting CARA funding and programs to good use. Now it’s time to extend CARA’s reach deeper into communities where the opioid crisis rages, and, given what we learned from people on the front lines of that crisis, add new policy reforms we know can make a difference. I’m excited to join Senator Portman and this bipartisan group of cosponsors to meld the commitments we made in the funding deal with the progress we enacted in CARA.”
 
“The opioid epidemic truly is a national crisis that is affecting families and communities across the country, and in West Virginia, we’ve become far too familiar with its consequences,” Senator Capito said. “While we’ve accomplished a lot in terms of drawing attention to the drug epidemic and providing resources to help address it, it’s painfully clear that we still have a long way to go and need to be doing even more. This bipartisan legislation will help continue efforts that are critical to fighting the opioid epidemic and providing help to individuals struggling with addiction. This is an important next step in a much broader effort, and I’m confident it will bring us closer to making real progress in this fight.” 
 
“Opioid addiction has increased exponentially in the last decade, rising to the level of a public health emergency and affecting millions of Americans across the county,” said Senator Klobuchar.“The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) has made real strides in tackling this epidemic, and CARA 2.0  will increase our investment and commitment to proven strategies for combating opioid addition. Doubling down on the opioid crisis is as critical as ever, and this bill will help more families to access the treatment and recovery services they need.”
 
“Combatting the opioid addiction crisis in Alaska continues to be one of my top priorities in the U.S. Senate,” said Senator Sullivan. “Building off the momentum of CARA, CARA 2.0 will significantly increase funding levels for evidence-based treatment programs and enhance prescription drug monitoring, while also addressing many challenges unique to Alaska, such as prioritizing highly rural areas, including tribal regions, in the direction of funding. The scourge of addiction knows no social, economic or geographic boundary – it affects Alaskans and Americans from all walks of life. I am pleased to work with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to ensure that those struggling get the help they need, when they need it.”
 
“The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act 2.0 is a critical next step in our efforts to help save lives and strengthen prevention, treatment, recovery, and law enforcement efforts,” Senator Hassan said. “As part of the bipartisan budget agreement, we secured $6 billion in additional funds to combat the opioid epidemic, and this bill identifies some of the key areas that should be prioritized as we work to get funding to communities that need it most. This bill will help support additional treatment capacity and it will also help ensure that first responders are safe and well trained when responding to overdoses – a priority that I have heard about from New Hampshire public safety officials. It would also increase potential penalties on opioid manufacturers who have played a significant role in fueling this epidemic. I am grateful to Senators Rob Portman, Sheldon Whitehouse, and all of my colleagues on both sides of the aisle who came together to introduce this bill, and I will continue working across party lines to pass this bill without delay and strengthen our comprehensive response to this crisis.”
 
“The opioid and heroin epidemic has afflicted every area of our society and has taken the lives of more the 10,000 Washingtonians in less than 20 years,” said Senator Cantwell. “This bipartisan bill is the next step needed to provide expanded treatment, education, and prevention to combat this growing crisis.  And importantly, this legislation strengthens penalties on drug manufacturers who negligently distribute opioids in our communities.” 
 
CARA, which became law on July 22, 2016, authorized an additional $181 million for anti-opioid education, treatment and recovery programs, which were funded at $267 million for Fiscal Year 2017. The recent budget agreement includes $6 billion in additional resources for Fiscal Years 2018-2019. CARA 2.0 will build on the original law by providing an additional $1 billion in funding authorization for CARA’s evidence-based prevention, enforcement, treatment, and recovery programs:
 
  • Require physicians and pharmacists use their state prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) upon prescribing or dispensing opioids.
  • Makes permanent CARA’s Section 303, which allows physician assistants and nurse practitioners to prescribe buprenorphine under the direction of a qualified physician.
  • Allows states to waive the limit on the number of patients a physician can treat with buprenorphine so long as they follow evidence-based guidelines. There is currently a cap of 100 patients per physician.
  • Increases civil and criminal penalties for opioid manufacturers that fail to report suspicious orders for opioids or fail to maintain effective controls against diversion of opioids.
  • Creates a national standard for recovery residence to ensure quality housing for individuals in long-term recovery.
  • Imposes three-day limit on initial opioid prescriptions for acute pain as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with exceptions for chronic pain or pain for other ongoing illnesses.
 
CARA 2.0 Authorization Levels:
  • $10 million to fund a National Education Campaign on the dangers of prescription opioid misuse, heroin, and lethal fentanyl (up from $5 million in the original CARA).
  • $300 million to expand evidence-based medication-assisted treatment (up from $25 million in the original CARA).
  • $300 million to expand first responder training and access to naloxone (up from $12 million in the original CARA).
  • $200 million to build a national infrastructure for recovery support services to help individuals move successfully from treatment into long-term recovery (up from $1 million in the original CARA).
  • $20 million to expand Veterans Treatment Courts (up from 6$ million in the original CARA).
  • $100 million to expand treatment for pregnant and postpartum women, including facilities that allow children to reside with their mothers (up from $17.9 million in the original CARA).
  • $60 million to help states develop an Infant Plan of Safe Care to assist states, hospitals and social services to report, track and assist newborns exposed to substances and their families (no authorization in the original CARA).
  • $10 million for a National Youth Recovery Initiative to develop, support, and maintain youth recovery support services (no authorization in the original CARA).
SAVE THE DATE!!
Elephant Stomp
Monday, May 21, 2018
Baton Rouge, LA
SAVE ANOTHER DATE!!
LFRW Day at the Legislature
Tuesday, May 22, 2018
Watch here for more information!!
Scenes from the 2018 Lincoln Reagan Banquet
LFRW Region 7 Vice President Michelle Pichon held a Region 7 meeting, and the ladies in attendance agreed, "The future's so bright I have to wear shades!"
Grand New Party
It began in a little schoolhouse in Ripon, Wisconsin, in 1854. A small group of dedicated abolitionists gathered to fight the expansion of slavery, and they gave birth to a Party dedicated to freedom and equal opportunity.
The name “Republican” was chosen, alluding to Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party and conveying a commitment to the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 
The Party was formally organized in July 1854 by thousands of anti-slavery activists at a convention in Jackson, Michigan. And it was no accident that two years later, in 1856, the first Republican National Convention took place in Philadelphia, where the Constitution was written.
Party of Freedom
Though popularized in a Thomas Nast cartoon, the GOP’s elephant symbol originated during the 1860 campaign, as a symbol of Republican strength.  Republicans envisioned “free soil, free speech, free labor.”  Under the leadership of President Abraham Lincoln, the GOP became the Party of the Union as well.
President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, but it was the entire Republican Party who freed the slaves.  The 1864 Republican National Convention called for the abolition of slavery, and Congressional Republicans passed the 13th Amendment unanimously, with only a few Democrat votes. 
The early women’s rights movement was solidly Republican, as it was a continuation of abolitionism.  They were careful not to be overly partisan, but as did Susan B. Anthony, most suffragists favored the GOP.  The 19th Amendment was written by a Republican senator and garnered greater support from Republicans than from Democrats.
Party of Prosperity
Low taxes, sound money, regulatory restraint: these were among the commonsense economic policies established by the GOP that brought about decades of prosperity after the Civil War.  Republicans encouraged innovation and rule of law.  Buttressed by Republican control in Congress, the McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt and Taft administrations cleared away obstacles to economic growth.
President Dwight Eisenhower and congressional Republicans appreciated the fact that the private sector, not government, is the engine of wealth creation. With his bold tax-cutting agenda, President Ronald Reagan revived the economy after years of Democrat malaise. 
Party of Vision
Theodore Roosevelt embodies our Party’s traditional concern for the environment, but the Republican commitment to the environment actually goes back much further than that.  For example, the world’s first national park, Yellowstone, was established during the Ulysses Grant administration.
President Eisenhower advocated groundbreaking civil rights legislation and vigorously enforced the Brown v Board of Education decision, sending the 101st Airborne to Little Rock when chaos erupted following integration at Central High.
Ronald Reagan explained the difference between Democrats and Republicans in a way that cannot be improved upon: “Two visions of the future, two fundamentally different ways of governing – their government of pessimism, fear, and limits, or ours of hope, confidence, and growth.  Their government sees people only as members of groups.  Ours serves all the people of America as individuals.”
President George H.W. Bush championed community and volunteer organizations and the tremendous power they have for doing good. He famously described them as “a brilliant diversity spread like stars, like a thousand points of light in a broad and peaceful sky.”
In the first decade of the 21st century, President George W. Bush made an unprecedented commitment to helping those in need beyond our shores through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), an aid program for countries devastated by HIV/AIDS. Since its inception, PEPFAR has saved over a million lives and currently provides over 5 million people with life-saving treatments.
Party of Strength
President Reagan and President George H.W. Bush led western democracies to victory over Soviet tyranny in the Cold War.  The George W. Bush administration maintained the military second-to-none and projected that power in the fight against international terrorism.
Party of the Future
Drawing inspiration from our Party’s history, today’s Republicans believe individuals, not government, make the best decisions; all people are entitled to equal rights; and decisions are best made close to home.
At the state level, the nation’s thirty Republican governors are making government more effective and efficient, spurring economic growth and striving to put more power in the hands of the people.
Nationally, Republicans recognize that the slow, bloated, top-down Washington bureaucracy is out-of-date in the 21st century. Our Party works to give Americans more choices—in healthcare, in education, in energy, and in the economy—and to free individuals and families from the intrusive overreach of federal bureaucrats.
The Party’s core principles of freedom and equal opportunity are as relevant today as at our founding, and they are the roadmap for American renewal in a new and interconnected world. 
MOMENTS IN HISTORY
March 20, 1854
First Republican Party meeting in Ripon, Wisconsin
January 1, 1863
President Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation
January 31, 1865
Republican-controlled 38th Congress passes the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery
June 13, 1866
With unanimous Republican support and against intense Democrat opposition, Congress passes the 14th Amendment
March 1, 1872
Republican-controlled 42nd Congress establishes Yellowstone as first national park
December 9, 1872
First African-American governor, Pinckney Pinchback (R-LA), inaugurated
March 4, 1917
First woman in Congress, Rep. Jeannette Rankin (R-MT), sworn in
June 4, 1919
Republican-controlled 66th Congress passes the 19th Amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote
June 2, 1924
Republican-controlled 68th Congress and President Calvin Coolidge grant citizenship to Native Americans with the Indian Citizenship Act
December 7, 1928
First Hispanic U.S. Senator, Senator Octaviano Larrazolo (R-NM), sworn in
January 3, 1949
Margaret Chase Smith (R-ME) becomes the first woman to serve in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.
May 17, 1954
Brown v Board of Education strikes down racial segregation in public schools; majority decision written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, former Republican governor (CA) and vice presidential nominee
August 21, 1959
first Asian-American U.S. Senator, Hiram Fong (R-HI), is seated
September 9, 1957
President Dwight Eisenhower signs the 1957 Civil Rights Act
June 10, 1964
Senate passes the 1964 Civil Rights Act when the Republican leader, Everett Dirksen (R-IL), defeats Democrat filibuster
September 25, 1981
Sandra Day O’Connor, appointed by President Reagan, becomes first woman on the Supreme Court
June 12, 1987
President Ronald Reagan calls for liberation of East Europeans from Communism with “Tear Down This Wall” speechGrand New Party

GOP - Our History:  

It began in a little schoolhouse in Ripon, Wisconsin, in 1854. A small group of dedicated abolitionists gathered to fight the expansion of slavery, and they gave birth to a Party dedicated to freedom and equal opportunity.

The name “Republican” was chosen, alluding to Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party and conveying a commitment to the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 

The Party was formally organized in July 1854 by thousands of anti-slavery activists at a convention in Jackson, Michigan. And it was no accident that two years later, in 1856, the first Republican National Convention took place in Philadelphia, where the Constitution was written.

Party of Freedom

Though popularized in a Thomas Nast cartoon, the GOP’s elephant symbol originated during the 1860 campaign, as a symbol of Republican strength.  Republicans envisioned “free soil, free speech, free labor.”  Under the leadership of President Abraham Lincoln, the GOP became the Party of the Union as well.


President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, but it was the entire Republican Party who freed the slaves.  The 1864 Republican National Convention called for the abolition of slavery, and Congressional Republicans passed the 13th Amendment unanimously, with only a few Democrat votes. 


The early women’s rights movement was solidly Republican, as it was a continuation of abolitionism.  They were careful not to be overly partisan, but as did Susan B. Anthony, most suffragists favored the GOP.  The 19th Amendment was written by a Republican senator and garnered greater support from Republicans than from Democrats.

Party of Prosperity
Low taxes, sound money, regulatory restraint: these were among the commonsense economic policies established by the GOP that brought about decades of prosperity after the Civil War.  Republicans encouraged innovation and rule of law.  Buttressed by Republican control in Congress, the McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt and Taft administrations cleared away obstacles to economic growth.

President Dwight Eisenhower and congressional Republicans appreciated the fact that the private sector, not government, is the engine of wealth creation. With his bold tax-cutting agenda, President Ronald Reagan revived the economy after years of Democrat malaise. 

Party of Vision

Theodore Roosevelt embodies our Party’s traditional concern for the environment, but the Republican commitment to the environment actually goes back much further than that.  For example, the world’s first national park, Yellowstone, was established during the Ulysses Grant administration.

President Eisenhower advocated groundbreaking civil rights legislation and vigorously enforced the Brown v Board of Education decision, sending the 101st Airborne to Little Rock when chaos erupted following integration at Central High.

Ronald Reagan explained the difference between Democrats and Republicans in a way that cannot be improved upon: “Two visions of the future, two fundamentally different ways of governing – their government of pessimism, fear, and limits, or ours of hope, confidence, and growth.  Their government sees people only as members of groups.  Ours serves all the people of America as individuals.”

President George H.W. Bush championed community and volunteer organizations and the tremendous power they have for doing good. He famously described them as “a brilliant diversity spread like stars, like a thousand points of light in a broad and peaceful sky.”

In the first decade of the 21st century, President George W. Bush made an unprecedented commitment to helping those in need beyond our shores through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), an aid program for countries devastated by HIV/AIDS. Since its inception, PEPFAR has saved over a million lives and currently provides over 5 million people with life-saving treatments.

Party of Strength
President Reagan and President George H.W. Bush led western democracies to victory over Soviet tyranny in the Cold War.  The George W. Bush administration maintained the military second-to-none and projected that power in the fight against international terrorism.

Party of the Future
Drawing inspiration from our Party’s history, today’s Republicans believe individuals, not government, make the best decisions; all people are entitled to equal rights; and decisions are best made close to home.

At the state level, the nation’s thirty Republican governors are making government more effective and efficient, spurring economic growth and striving to put more power in the hands of the people.

Nationally, Republicans recognize that the slow, bloated, top-down Washington bureaucracy is out-of-date in the 21st century. Our Party works to give Americans more choices—in healthcare, in education, in energy, and in the economy—and to free individuals and families from the intrusive overreach of federal bureaucrats.

The Party’s core principles of freedom and equal opportunity are as relevant today as at our founding, and they are the roadmap for American renewal in a new and interconnected world. 

MOMENTS IN HISTORY

March 20, 1854
First Republican Party meeting in Ripon, Wisconsin

January 1, 1863
President Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation

January 31, 1865
Republican-controlled 38th Congress passes the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery

June 13, 1866
With unanimous Republican support and against intense Democrat opposition, Congress passes the 14th Amendment

March 1, 1872
Republican-controlled 42nd Congress establishes Yellowstone as first national park

December 9, 1872
First African-American governor, Pinckney Pinchback (R-LA), inaugurated

March 4, 1917
First woman in Congress, Rep. Jeannette Rankin (R-MT), sworn in

June 4, 1919
Republican-controlled 66th Congress passes the 19th Amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote

June 2, 1924
Republican-controlled 68th Congress and President Calvin Coolidge grant citizenship to Native Americans with the Indian Citizenship Act

December 7, 1928
First Hispanic U.S. Senator, Senator Octaviano Larrazolo (R-NM), sworn in

January 3, 1949
Margaret Chase Smith (R-ME) becomes the first woman to serve in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.

May 17, 1954
Brown v Board of Education strikes down racial segregation in public schools; majority decision written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, former Republican governor (CA) and vice presidential nominee

August 21, 1959
First Asian-American U.S. Senator, Hiram Fong (R-HI), is seated

September 9, 1957
President Dwight Eisenhower signs the 1957 Civil Rights Act

June 10, 1964
Senate passes the 1964 Civil Rights Act when the Republican leader, Everett Dirksen (R-IL), defeats Democrat filibuster

September 25, 1981
Sandra Day O’Connor, appointed by President Reagan, becomes first woman on the Supreme Court

June 12, 1987
President Ronald Reagan calls for liberation of East Europeans from Communism with “Tear Down This Wall” speech.